MSB donates K4.3m equipment to QUECH

Written by  Sam Phiri

Malawi Savings Bank (MSB) has donated hospital equipment worth over K4.3 million to Queens Elizabeth Central Hospital to be used in the Pediatric ward and Chatinkha maternity Wing respectively.

CEO of MSB Ian Bonongwe delivering the equipment CEO of MSB Ian Bonongwe delivering the equipment
03
June


The donation includes two oxygen concentrators, two suction machines and one patient monitor for the pediatric ward and one duo oxygen concentrator, a suction and a sterilization machine for Gogo Chatinkha Ward.


Speaking during the handing over ceremony of the equipment on Tuesday in Blantyre, Chief executive officer for the bank Ian Bonongwe said the equipment has been made available through contribution from the bank’s forex bureau.


“Children are a remarkable event in every one’s life as they bring joy and hope to the nation but with high incidences of child mortality rate, child birth can be overshadowed by the untimely demise of children due to lack of necessary equipment that is used to sustain lives,” said Bonongwe.


The donation is in response to number of fundraising activities the hospital staff has been conducting in search for the K65 million required to buy the most needed equipments at the hospital.


Bonongwe added that his bank understands that the high mortality rate in the country is among others caused by lack of equipment.


“We know that the donated equipment is not enough but it is a glimpse of hope to many families in Blantyre and surrounding areas but also the nation because Queen Elizabeth central Hospital is the biggest referral hospital in Malawi,” he said.


He, however, called on the hospital officials to take care of the equipment so that it can benefit a lot of people for a longer time.


On his behalf chief hospital administrator Themba Mhango thanked the bank for donating to the hospital.
Mhango said MSB has been assisting the hospital with the most basic things they before.

He however hailed companies that donate essential materials saying having a hospital that is fully equipped helps them to meet the needs of their patients.


"When people are coming here have expectations that we are supposed to meet. These people pay taxes and expect us to use the taxes on their health so it’s frustrating to a doctor who spent seven years at school to fail curing a patient due to lack of equipment," added Mhango.


The two departments of Pediatric ward and Chatinkha maternity Wing admits over 25,000 children every year.

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